< April 2019 newsletter


Iwi seeking governance of the Marine & Coastal Area, and authority over water

On March 26 Maori claimants from around the country gathered to make submissions to the Waitangi Tribunal for the rights to their coastal water areas, saying that since the foreshore and seabed march in 2004, progress has been slow in recognising iwi governance of their marine and coastal areas.

At the same time concerns were also raised with the Waitangi Tribunal about what has been claimed as the exploitation of iwi water rights. Former co-chair of the Māori Council Maanu Paul, who now leads the Matātua Māori Council in their bid for water rights in the Bay of Plenty, addressed the issue of foreign companies taking NZ water offshore and selling it. He says, "We took that issue to the Supreme Court and it was there that the supreme judge said that it was Māori that had authority over water. He didn't say it was the Crown”.

Media coverage:

Maori Television: Māori claimants still seek rights to marine and coastal areas

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