< June 2018 newsletter


Auckland Plan 2050 Adopted – With The Anti-Democratic Provisions

The Auckland Plan 2050, the long-term strategy for Auckland’s growth and development, and which provides a framework to inform decisions, has been adopted by Auckland Council.

The original Auckland Plan was adopted in 2012.  This current version is fundamentally different.  For one, it has been  heavily influenced by the Independent Maori Statutory Board and its Maori Plan for Tamaki Makaurau.  At the Planning Committee meeting (5thJune), Councillor Mike Lee commented that the revised plan is markedly inferior to the original, and questioned the legality of the plan in terms of the Act, as he believes it does not comply.

The agenda of the Auckland Council Planning Committee meeting (5thJune), is available here, and the minutes here

For those of us concerned about the anti-democratic path Auckland Council is taking, there is much to be alarmed about. References to the Treaty of Waitangi, partnership with Maori, and co-governance, are peppered throughout the Plan.  It recognises the Treaty as the founding document, and the basis of a partnership between mana whenua and the Auckland Council.

Mechanisms to contribute towards implementing the ‘Māori Identity and Wellbeing Outcome’ include co-governance arrangements  between Māori and the council, or iwi and the Crown, to allow for more direct influence and greater exercise of authority by mana whenua over natural resouces.  In 2017 there were eight co-governance and co-management arrangements between Auckland Council and Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau.  The Plan states that the number of sites that involve Māori in governance roles is expected to grow.

These excerpts from the Plan give a small indication of the council has agreed to:

  • “Political structures will evolve within Auckland as the model of co‐governance is refined and te Tiriti settlements call for new arrangements”. 
  • “Mana whenua have a unique role to play in governance and leadership in Auckland”.

(‘Advance mana whenua rangatiratanga* in leadership and decision‐making and provide for customary rights p.93).

One of the stated priorities is to advance mana whenua rangatiratanga in leadership and decision‐making, including: “partnering and influencing property and infrastructure development outcomes”(p.93)

*Rangatiratanga – see glossary p.358 of the revised version of Auckland Plan 2050, available here (N.B the passages highlighted in green show the latest revision of the text - as at June 5th).

Only four councillors voted against the adoption of the Plan – for a variety of reasons. They are: Mike Lee, Greg Sayers, John Watson, and Wayne Walker.

The final version of the Plan will not be released to the public until August.

If your ward Councillor voted for the Plan, contact them and ask for an explanation as to why they have endorsed anti-democratic policies for Auckland’s future.

Go back to the June 2018 newsletter


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