< April 2019 newsletter


Hastings District Council joins the Hall of Shame

A big thank you to those who contacted Hasting District councillors to encourage them to vote against the proposal to enable four members of the Maori Joint Committee to sit and vote on the council’s four standing committees. Unfortunately, enough councillors (10-4) felt able to turn their back on democracy by appointing unelected Maori to all committees. 

This is despite currently having five councillors who have identified as being of Maori descent, (according to the HDC website).

Mayoral hopeful Stuart Perry has already come out strongly against the move when he wrote in the Hawke’s Bay Today on Friday 29 March that “making decisions about the direction of our community is the responsibility of those councillors we elect”.

It is important to let those who vote against the undermining of our democracy know that we appreciate their stand. Please send messages of support to the four councillors who did so:

Cr Malcom Dixon councillor.dixon@hdc.govt.nz

Cr Rod Heaps councillor.heaps@hdc.govt.nz

Cr Simon Nixon councillor.nixon@hdc.govt.nz

Cr Kevin Watkins councillor.watkins@hdc.govt.nz

Media Coverage:

Radio NZ: Hastings councillors vote in favour of more Māori representation in committees

NZ Herald: Tears and singing as Hastings District Council votes to appoint tangata whenua representation

Point of Order: Another Battle of Hastings – and one in the eye for those bloody democrats

Go back to the April 2019 newsletter


RELATED ARTICLES


WDC joins the shameful councils debasing our democratic governance systems

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‘Partnership’ - a way of heading off costly litigation?

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The Waikato District Council Blueprint Project

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'Point of Order' goes into bat for democracy

Following the Hasting District Council’s decision to appoint Māori representatives with speaking and voting rights to its four standing committees, (thereby sparing them the need to campaign for election), Victoria University of Wellington published an article on its website headed Academics commend Hastings District Council for inclusive, effective decision-making. Continue reading