< June 2020 newsletter


This is how the Treaty partnership works in practise, folks

The partnership interpretation of the Treaty of Waitangi is manifesting in a myriad of ways. The recent unlawful closure of the road to the North Cape by Ngati Kuri, with the collaboration of government agencies including the Department of Conservation, the NZ Police and the NZ Transport Agency, is but another example.

You may well ask how a group of citizens can take it upon themselves to break the law - including physically threatening MP Matt King - and garner the assistance of government agencies to do so. This can be explained by the insidious incorporation of the treaty principles which have been brokered into government legislation, with far-reaching consequences for all sectors and levels of government activity - the result of a constitutional partnership marching through government sectors.

This is clearly demonstrated by the way in which the Treaty principles have been adopted by the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) - the Crown entity which is tasked with promoting safe and functional transport by land, and administering the New Zealand state highway network - but now also another avenue for the incorporation of tribal authority into government institutions and processes.

NZTA has developed a strategy to work together with Māori which includes recognising and respecting “the individual autonomy and authority of Māori”.

“The Transport Agency recognises and respects Te Tiriti o Waitangi and will work with Māori to build strong, meaningful and enduring relationships to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes. Te Ara Kotahi (our Māori Strategy) provides strategic direction to the Transport Agency on how we work with and respond to Māori as the Crown’s Treaty partner, and what this means for how we do business”.

NZTA VOWS TO ACTIVELY SUPPORT THE MĀORI ECONOMY

Working in partnership with Māori includes supporting the Māori economy by exploring opportunities to partner with Māori in transport investments.

  • “The Transport Agency’s investment decision making framework and guidance demonstrate a partnership approach with iwi”.
  • “Develop iwi project agreements and MOU templates”.
  • “Understand what Māori businesses exist”.
  • “Develop and implement a Social Procurement Framework that provides for Māori participation”.

And much more – please read the Maori Strategy on the NZTA website here.

Recommended reading

For an understanding on how the insidious subversion of our democratic principles has come about, please read Professor Elizabeth Rata’s ‘Marching through the Institutions’: The Neotribal Elite and the Treaty of Waitangi’

Also, NZ Herald article (7 Nov. 2006) Tough talker on tribal issues

Media Coverage

Northland Age: ‘This isn’t about Covid’

NZ Herald: Cape Reinga roadblock: Iwi sends out invitations to reopening ceremony

TVNZ:  

National MP in confrontation with members of local iwi after being refused access to Cape Reinga

Go back to the June 2020 newsletter


RELATED ARTICLES


Labour continues down race-based path - undermining equal rights, democracy

Labour’s Māori Manifesto 2020 recommits to the partnership path with Māori. They will continue to support the role of Māori Crown relations – Te Arawhiti in growing the capability and capacity of government departments and organisations to be better Treaty partners, promising to look to take even bolder steps to create change. Continue reading

Labour boasts of roadblock partnership

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Royal Commission needs to investigate illegal roadblocks

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The road to Cape Reinga still illegally blocked by Ngāti Kuri

“It's my customary rights and I’m prepared to knock you out if you pass that gate,” a person blocking access says in a video filmed by Northland MP Matt King. Continue reading

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Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has been called on to step in and provide strong and unequivocal leadership on the continuing and growing proliferation of illegal roadblocks. Democracy Action says that the self-appointed community activists and patched gang members manning the roadblocks have been emboldened by Police inaction on the clear offences. The Police seem to have taken their lead from Minister of Police Stuart Nash’s soft stance. Continue reading

"It is disgraceful" - Gang members participating in illegal roadblocks

During the COVID-19 epidemic, all New Zealanders are subject to lawful travel restrictions designed to protect public health, and which are enforceable by the police. Those who blatantly flout the restrictions can be arrested. There is however one group which appears to be above the law, and community group Democracy Action is calling on the government to take immediate action against the illegal blockades on public roads. Continue reading

THE OFFICAL SUPPORT FOR ILLEGAL ROADBLOCKS IS UNTENABLE

The vigilantes manning the unauthorised roadblocks on public roads have no more legal authority to do so than your neighbour. Despite this, the highest authorities in Government and Police are encouraging these self-appointed groups to stop New Zealanders travelling and to turn them back if, in their inexpert opinion, motorists are breaking travel restrictions.  Continue reading