< August 2019 newsletter


Resource Management Act to be reviewed – again!

Environment Minister David Parker has launched an "overhaul" of the Resource Management Act (RMA), seeking to cut complexity and costs and better protect the environment. 

The key issues to be addressed include:

  • removing unnecessary complexity, especially of consenting processes;
  • ensuring faster and more responsive land use planning;
  • ensuring Māori have more participation;
  • clarifying the meaning of iwi authority and hapū; and
  • whether the RMA should align with the Green Party's Zero Carbon Bill if it passes.

Media coverage

Newshub: 'It's unacceptable': David Parker launches Resource Management Act 'overhaul'


RMA

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